Trevor Twells

Trevor Twells

User Experience Designer and Artist

Design Work   |  Artwork

TELUS Billing Redesign

Billing has always been a thorn in any major telecommunication company’s side. Customers are rarely happy when paying for their phone plan, especially when many aren’t very transparent about what they are being charged for. This is where usability and empathy step in.  We were tasked with redesigning the TELUS app’s current billing system to make clearer and friendlier for customers.

Scotiabank Investment Onboarding

We were tasked with coming up with a new way to entice customers; who did not feel like investing was for them, to start investing with Scotiabank.  This meant coming up with a new experience that was both non-invasive, but compelling at the same time.

Scotiabank Digital Styleguide

In an effort to unify different Scotiabank creative teams touching North American properties. We created the Scotiabank Digital Style Guide.  The Style Guide contained specific experiencial and aesthetic rules written by both the User Interface and User Experience teams.

Playsmart Redesign

OLG Playsmart is a redesign of OLG’s responsible gambling website, KnowYourLimit.ca. I was tasked to design a new mobile-focused experience, while having the challenge of keeping the same content as the old site.

Artwork  |  Design Work

STEREO: A Glasses-less 3D Exhibit

STEREO: A Glasses-less 3D Exhibit was a natural follow-up to “Congestion in 3D” unlike its predecessor, this exhibit used lenticular technology to show 3D images without the need for glasses. In contrast to “Congestion in 3D” this exhibit did not have a social cause, but rather its purpose was to pen a love-letter to Toronto by depicting it with a unique and captivating medium. By using glasses-less 3D photography, the medium breathed life into its depictions and allowed viewers to experience Toronto with new depth.

Congestion in 3D

Congestion in 3D was my first public art show. The concept was to create an art project which captures glimpses of one of the most congested, unsustainable areas in Toronto; its transit system. The exhibit used anaglyph 3D images and sound to create a truly claustrophobic environment. The exhibit also came fully equipped with 3D glasses, allowing exhibit goers to view the photos on display and experience the full weight of the art’s oppressive effect.